The Swap Portrait Project

The Swap Portrait Project
Some months ago Stuart Pilkington, a London-based curator of online photography projects, invited me to participate in The Swap. As Stuart explains the project, The Swap is “a very simple concept. On two separate days two photographers photograph each other and create two portraits.  On day one, person one is the photographer and the other is the subject and on day two they swap roles so that the photographer becomes the subject and visa versa.” For one of my swaps (I have two) I chose Rachel Wolfe, whose work I came across in Fraction Magazine. Because she is pursuing an MFA in photography… Read more…

Moments Preserved, a Future Imagined

Moments Preserved, a Future Imagined
A still rowboat and its watery reflection, a man holding two oars in balance, and five yellow lines like a mysterious musical notation: the photograph drew me in as I looked over a table of holiday books. Browsing was my principle pleasure. Book titles and covers, even texts stacked by university course number, set off my imagination. Fifteen years old with little savings and income, I infrequently made a purchase. Browsing was enough.  Not tethered to what lay between a book’s covers, my mind could travel where whim might take it. I paged through Irving Penn’s Moments Preserved. Thirty five… Read more…

Double Dozen

Double Dozen show opening September 5 at Seattle's Lisa Harris Gallery. Twelve guest artists chosen by 12 gallery artists, who are also showing new work. My guest is Kathryn Abarbanel, a Seattle artist who photographed hundreds of personal belongings left behind in a house she and her partner, Maria Gamboa, bought and rehabilitated. Seattle Vanguard published a review of Abarbanel's project when A Gallery showed Abarbanel's sculpture constructed of clothing from the house and her handmade book of photographs. Read more…

Kathryn Abarbanel’s Rathaus

Kathryn Abarbanel’s Rathaus
Among photobooks I find myself returning to are those that convey a deep intimacy between photographer and subject. While the sequencing of photographs, form of the books, typography and other design choices all work with images to produce this effect, design aspects seem to dissolve away when I browse these books,  leaving only the photographer, subject, and me in a shared experience. Maxwell Anderson’s See You Soon documents a summer spent with Jun, a woman he met by chance, felt “immediately compelled to photograph her,” and said goodbye to after a brief love affair. The book’s photographs give the impression of… Read more…

Three Gestures

Three Gestures
Three gloves, picked up from the street, seem to retain the gestures of the people who lost them. Read more…